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  • Equestrian Land Conservation Resource Equestrian Land Conservation Resource

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Mission Statement

ELCR is a resource for all groups and individuals who strive to preserve open land for equestrian use.

ELCR provides direct assistance to individuals and groups working to preserve land for equestrian use, whether publically or privately held. It assists horse people across the country to identify all of the resources available to them and to maximize their potential for success, offers advise about how to be anchored by strong, local equestrian interests, to develop creative partnerships that include local conservation and other user groups, to be environmentally responsible and financially sustainable over the long run, and to take action to provide permanent access for equestrians.

Based in Elizabeth, Illinois, the staff of the national office fields telephone calls and e-mails and sends out countless packets of information. "Every day brings a different challenge," says Executive Director Kandee Haertel. "The phone rings and we go into action. Almost every call requests assistance of some type - how to build a trail, who to contact about ?whatever,? or a request to supply information regarding particular circumstances. Each situation is unique to that specific location, but most inquiries have similarities." By similarities, Haertel is referring to the common thread that horse owners face across the country, such as government procedures and compatibility issues with other land users.

Over the years, the Equestrian Land Conservation Resource has established itself as a credible organization with a valid and urgent message regarding the need for land conservation and the role equestrians can play in this effort. People are beginning to hear this message. The groundwork has been laid for solid, effective communication, and the doors opened for interaction among diverse groups of equestrians and other open space and trail users.

Horse owners, as a group, face many challenges in preserving and protecting land. Although the horse community is a major economic entity, and although equestrians throughout the country face the impending loss of their riding land, there is limited communication on the topic of how to preserve land for equestrian use among different groups within the horse industry. Mobilizing people at the grassroots level is often difficult, as individuals and equestrian groups often are not oriented toward activism. Action is most effective at the local level, where obtaining information about land use policies, liability, easements, trusts, stewardship/impact issues and the rights of all involved can be daunting. Pressures from development and/or competing uses often compound land protection challenges.

ELCR does not directly influence or lobby for policy changes. Rather, it works within the equestrian and conservation communities to raise awareness about land protection issues. This, in turn, results in grassroots initiatives. The most successful and long lasting initiatives are the result of local action by equestrians. However, many local individuals and groups simply do not have the knowledge of how to proceed and often languish or even fail to proceed. As a resource, ELCR is filling this gap in the equestrian community?s knowledge and effectiveness.

Description

ELCR is a resource for all groups and individuals who strive to preserve open land for equestrian use.

ELCR provides direct assistance to individuals and groups working to preserve land for equestrian use, whether publically or privately held. It assists horse people across the country to identify all of the resources available to them and to maximize their potential for success, offers advise about how to be anchored by strong, local equestrian interests, to develop creative partnerships that include local conservation and other user groups, to be environmentally responsible and financially sustainable over the long run, and to take action to provide permanent access for equestrians.

Based in Elizabeth, Illinois, the staff of the national office fields telephone calls and e-mails and sends out countless packets of information. "Every day brings a different challenge," says Executive Director Kandee Haertel. "The phone rings and we go into action. Almost every call requests assistance of some type - how to build a trail, who to contact about ?whatever,? or a request to supply information regarding particular circumstances. Each situation is unique to that specific location, but most inquiries have similarities." By similarities, Haertel is referring to the common thread that horse owners face across the country, such as government procedures and compatibility issues with other land users.

Over the years, the Equestrian Land Conservation Resource has established itself as a credible organization with a valid and urgent message regarding the need for land conservation and the role equestrians can play in this effort. People are beginning to hear this message. The groundwork has been laid for solid, effective communication, and the doors opened for interaction among diverse groups of equestrians and other open space and trail users.

Horse owners, as a group, face many challenges in preserving and protecting land. Although the horse community is a major economic entity, and although equestrians throughout the country face the impending loss of their riding land, there is limited communication on the topic of how to preserve land for equestrian use among different groups within the horse industry. Mobilizing people at the grassroots level is often difficult, as individuals and equestrian groups often are not oriented toward activism. Action is most effective at the local level, where obtaining information about land use policies, liability, easements, trusts, stewardship/impact issues and the rights of all involved can be daunting. Pressures from development and/or competing uses often compound land protection challenges.

ELCR does not directly influence or lobby for policy changes. Rather, it works within the equestrian and conservation communities to raise awareness about land protection issues. This, in turn, results in grassroots initiatives. The most successful and long lasting initiatives are the result of local action by equestrians. However, many local individuals and groups simply do not have the knowledge of how to proceed and often languish or even fail to proceed. As a resource, ELCR is filling this gap in the equestrian community?s knowledge and effectiveness.

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