• Charleston Animal Society Charleston Animal Society


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Mission Statement

The Mission of the Charleston Animal Society is to prevent cruelty to animals.


The South Carolina Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded in Charleston in 1874, and received a state charter in 1880. Its immediate concerns were to combat the rampant cruelty to animals, including the neglect of work-animals, the inhumane shipping of cattle, and the epidemic of stray dogs. The society also campaigned successfully to improve the abominable conditions of the city-operated dog pound.

A Safe Haven: The society continued to work toward a more humane environment to house abandoned animals and permanent homes. In 1948, private funds were raised to open the first animal shelter on Meeting Street. As the pet population grew, other sites followed. Volunteers managed the operation of these facilities and local veterinarians donated their services.

The John Ancrum SPCA assumed residency on Leeds Avenue in 1981. This first-class facility reflected a long and cooperative partnership between the agency and Charleston County Council. Upon completion of the shelter, the county terminated its own animal pound and contracted with the SPCA to provide care for all of the animals collected by animal control officers. In 2008, Charleston Animal Society moved to it's current location on Remount Road.

The Charleston Animal Society continues to fight animal cruelty, find homes for abandoned animals, and reduce pet over-population. The greatest challenge facing the agency today is finding space and resources to increase pet adoptions as the number of abandoned pets increases steadily with our growing community. Your Support is Needed to Continue this Tradition of Care and Commitment to Excellence.





Average Review 1 reviews

Would you recommend Charleston Animal Society?

by Alicia M. (October 17, 2013)
This week, I discovered that this facility dumps old animals out in the woods, rather than take care of the sick ones. I took a sick animal to the facility twice. The first time, the animal mysteriously returned to my house. I was confused so I took him back and dropped him off again. I then discovered the true owner of the animal, and attempted to get him back from the facility, but several employees gave me the run around and told me that the animal was being returned to my home. I waited all day, and the animal never arrived. I eventually had to contact the Director and go meet her and the vet in person, still trying to find out what happened to this animal. The Director was quite rude and threw her pen and walked out of the meeting. The vet confided in me that they "TNR" older animals that aren't considered adoptable. TNR means transport and release. And the vet said that the volunteer driver dropped the cat off in a wooded area near my home. I am completely disgusted.
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