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Grantwriting and Fundraising

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ORGANIZATION: BCA Global

  • 22 people are interested
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We are looking for individuals who have grant-writing or fundraising skills to plan and implement the BCA's fundraising efforts. Here is a bit of information about the BCA from our website: In today's changing and challenging environment education will be a minimum requirement to attain career success and advancement in any industry. The same holds true for the culinary and hospitality industry, the largest industry in America today. As the foodservice industry continues to develop, it will depend upon the services of a highly trained workforce. BCA plays an important role in preparing students and professionals of color (Asian-American, Native America, Hispanic, and Black) with the specialized skills needed for this field which translates to social-economic empowerment for themselves and their families. As a key resource to the industry supporting a diverse pool of qualified young people, the BCA creates the opportunity to advance the growth of diversity from a grassroots and foundational level and serves an important niche. That is why BCA strives to increase programs through support so we may continue to provide educational information and industry exposure which will help individuals become valuable employees crucial to the continued growth of the culinary and hospitality industry today and the future. The BCA methodology of bridging foodservice and diversity excellence will also be the strategic platform and vehicle to introduce the importance of food sustainability, waste reduction, and health issues presently not being addressed in urban foodservice and communities. All funding scope will focused on the Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community framework. Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community
Overview January 15, 2018, marked the release of Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community (MEBC), a collection of essays from social-justice leaders working in health equity and the culinary arts. It was also the launch of a nationwide initiative (Loveisfood.org), to address the health crisis in communities across America with a focus on poor nutrition at its root cause. Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community introduces communities of color to a new paradigm and provides new frameworks of approaching public health in marginalized populations that lack access to food-health education.
Background
"The Beloved Community" is a term that was first coined in the early days of the 20th Century by the philosopher-theologian Josiah Royce, who founded the Fellowship of Reconciliation. However, it was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., also a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, who popularized the term and invested it with a deeper meaning that has captured the imagination of people of goodwill all over the world. Dr. King’s Beloved Community is a global vision, in which the health of all people from all spectrums are necessary for a productive and well community. Economic and social justices are the twin pillars supporting the Beloved Community. These twin pillars are also necessary for a healthy society.
Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community is a new approach to disrupting the current lack of awareness, cultivate a healthy focus on food and create the platform for systems change in food and social justice in community. This is an approach to health equity as an expression of dignity, self-respect and self-actualization. The goal is to remind people that our own health investment is a way to care for ourselves, increase our productivity and show we care about everyone around us and the people we love and respect. We are working to re-connect food to family, community, culture and faith.
Problem Statement
There is a health crisis in communities across America and poor nutrition is a root cause. Diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and cancer occur at significantly higher rates among people of color. Consequently, life expectancy for communities of color is 4 to 5 years less. More distressingly, infant mortality is 8% higher. According to the CDC thirteen percent of African Americans of all ages report that they are in fair or poor health. Adult obesity rates for African Americans are higher than those for whites in nearly every state of the nation. 37 percent of men and nearly 50 percent of women are obese. African Americans have higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease than other groups.
Leading causes of death among this group are heart disease, cancer, and stroke. There are 13.24 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in Hispanic populations. Ten percent of Hispanics of all ages report they are in fair or poor health. A total of 37.9 percent of Latinos age 20 and over were obese in 2013. Obesity rates were higher in women (43 percent) than men (34.3 percent). Fourteen percent of Hispanics have been diagnosed with diabetes compared with 8 percent of whites. They have higher rates of end-stage renal disease caused by diabetes. Native Americans are also dramatically impacted by lack of access to nutritious food. The occurrence of diabetes is 2.3 times higher among Native Americans.Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community
Overview January 15, 2018, marked the release of Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community (MEBC), a collection of essays from social-justice leaders working in health equity and the culinary arts. It was also the launch of a nationwide initiative (Loveisfood.org), to address the health crisis in communities across America with a focus on poor nutrition at its root cause. Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community introduces communities of color to a new paradigm and provides new frameworks of approaching public health in marginalized populations that lack access to food-health education.
Background
"The Beloved Community" is a term that was first coined in the early days of the 20th Century by the philosopher-theologian Josiah Royce, who founded the Fellowship of Reconciliation. However, it was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., also a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, who popularized the term and invested it with a deeper meaning that has captured the imagination of people of goodwill all over the world. Dr. King’s Beloved Community is a global vision, in which the health of all people from all spectrums are necessary for a productive and well community. Economic and social justices are the twin pillars supporting the Beloved Community. These twin pillars are also necessary for a healthy society.
Mindful Eating for the Beloved Community is a new approach to disrupting the current lack of awareness, cultivate a healthy focus on food and create the platform for systems change in food and social justice in community. This is an approach to health equity as an expression of dignity, self-respect and self-actualization. The goal is to remind people that our own health investment is a way to care for ourselves, increase our productivity and show we care about everyone around us and the people we love and respect. We are working to re-connect food to family, community, culture and faith.
Problem Statement
There is a health crisis in communities across America and poor nutrition is a root cause. Diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and cancer occur at significantly higher rates among people of color. Consequently, life expectancy for communities of color is 4 to 5 years less. More distressingly, infant mortality is 8% higher. According to the CDC thirteen percent of African Americans of all ages report that they are in fair or poor health. Adult obesity rates for African Americans are higher than those for whites in nearly every state of the nation. 37 percent of men and nearly 50 percent of women are obese. African Americans have higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease than other groups.
Leading causes of death among this group are heart disease, cancer, and stroke. There are 13.24 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in Hispanic populations. Ten percent of Hispanics of all ages report they are in fair or poor health. A total of 37.9 percent of Latinos age 20 and over were obese in 2013. Obesity rates were higher in women (43 percent) than men (34.3 percent). Fourteen percent of Hispanics have been diagnosed with diabetes compared with 8 percent of whites. They have higher rates of end-stage renal disease caused by diabetes. Native Americans are also dramatically impacted by lack of access to nutritious food. The occurrence of diabetes is 2.3 times higher among Native Americans.

  • Please check out our website, www.bcaglobal.org for more information on our organization.
If interested, please respond to this e-mail with a cover letter as the e-mail body and a resume attached as a Word document if possible. Please include possible dates for a phone interview. We will be in contact within 1 weeks to. Thank you in advance for your interest in working with the BCA

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About BCA Global

Location:

Mailing Address: 244 Madison Avenue, Suite 305, New York, NY 10016, US

Mission Statement

The BCA is a nationwide non-profit educational and networking organization of hospitality and food service professionals. Incorporated as a 501(c)(3) in 1998, our mission is to create exposure and provide educational and professional opportunities for culinary and hospitality professionals of color. We accomplish this objective by providing quality educational and employment resources, job coaching, mentoring and assistance with placement, and networking support. Additionally, the BCA exposes inner-city high school students to the culinary arts through workshops and opportunities that introduce culinary arts as a viable career option.

Description

In 1993, three graduates of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY, including the current president, Alex Askew, met to discuss issues concerning African-Americans in the culinary and hospitality industries. The resulting organization, the Black Culinarian Alliance, was created to analyze and address the lack of education, awareness and exposure for African-Americans in these fields. The Black Culinarian Alliance would prove beneficial for both African-Americans and the culinary and hospitality industries. With education as a cornerstone, the organization moved forward in promoting career opportunities for African-Americans in the culinary and hospitality fields. Operating as the Black Culinarian Alumni Chapter of the Culinary Institute of America, it was the first membership of its kind for minority graduates of a culinary institution.

Incorporated as the Black Culinarian Alliance in 1998, and now known simply as the BCA, membership is composed of all ethnic groups and represents one of the largest percentages of professional women in the industry. Embracing this inclusion and understanding the rapidly growing multicultural audience and marketplace, the BCA continues with its objectives and remains focused on its mission as it pertains to all culinary professionals and students of color.

CAUSE AREAS

Board Development
Community
Race & Ethnicity
Board Development, Community, Race & Ethnicity

WHEN

We'll work with your schedule.

WHERE

This is a Virtual Opportunity with no fixed address.

SKILLS

  • Verbal / Written Communication
  • Grant Writing / Research

GOOD FOR

  • People 55+

REQUIREMENTS

  • Appox 2 hours a week

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